UCLA


People With Spinal Injuries Are Regaining Use of Their Limbs in an Amazing Way

Date: 
March 30, 2018
Inside UCLA’s Neuroplasticity and Repair Laboratory

Brian Gomez has his fingers wrapped around a small bar attached to three short springs in a rectangular metal frame. It’s similar to the handlebar brake lever of a dirt bike, like the one Gomez was riding in 2011 that malfunctioned, causing a crash that left him paralyzed below the neck. He’s trying to close his hand, but the bar doesn’t budge. Then a switch is flipped, and tiny electrodes implanted on his spinal cord begin firing. “It’s like a fluid shock going through” his body, he says. Gomez straightens in his wheelchair. His forearm twitches, and his grip tightens. The metal bar moves.

Climate and Community

Publication:
Date: 
January 1, 2018
Jon Christensen’s passion is for people and how they understand and are affected by the environment.

Jon Christensen moved around the U.S. and Europe as a child and attended high school in Spain and Chicago. He graduated from San Francisco State University and spent years writing about the environment for public radio and such publications as The New York Times. He then pivoted to academia, but his passion remained the same. Now an adjunct professor and journalist-in-residence at UCLA’s Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, he combines research and journalism to communicate about ways in which to address environmental justice and adapt to climate change.

The New Urbanscape

Publication:
Date: 
January 1, 2018
UCLA’s cityLAB is working with campus partners to engineer changes in how we use physical spaces during a digital era.

For a few weeks in the spring of 2015, in a patio behind UCLA’s Broad Art Center in the northeast corner of campus, stood a new building. It wasn’t a classroom or a lecture hall. It was a house.

Neighborhood Watching

Publication:
Date: 
April 1, 2017
What are the unintended consequences of building the city of tomorrow?

Orinio Opinaldo had been watching his West Adams neighborhood change for years. Throughout the 1990s, the area had gradually filled in with apartment buildings and higher-end housing. Opinaldo saw neighbors kicked out of rental units or bought out of homes by developers looking to reposition their properties. The pace of change quickened with the 2012 phase-one opening of the Expo Line light rail train connecting downtown, USC and Culver City.