Landscape Architecture

Photos: Next Wave

January 1, 2018
Japan braces for future tsunamis

Cover of the January 2018 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.
Cover of the January 2018 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

© Nate Berg

Fan Favorite

October 20, 2017
How Studio-MLA learned to embrace the potential of the sports stadium

Among Southern California landscape architecture firms, Los Angeles-based Studio-MLA (formerly Mia Lehrer + Associates) is arguably highbrow. Known for public spaces like the 1,300-acre Orange County Great Park and Vista Hermosa Park in an underserved section of Los Angeles, and transformative master plans for infrastructuralized landscapes like the Los Angeles River and the Silver Lake Reservoir, the firm has a serious approach to the needs of Southern California and the services landscape architecture can provide.

Goodbye Highways

February 7, 2017
The carving up of cities by expressways is still a civil rights problem, but it's being solved as an economic one.

Since freeways began slicing through cities in the United States more than 75 years ago, they have carved deep and lasting lines of separation through countless communities. Many of these communities—located in so-called blighted areas—were made up of people of color who were simply pushed aside by the transportation officials building out the nation’s vast network of interstates and urban freeways. In a somewhat surprising speech in March 2016, U.S.

Better Luck This Time

June 9, 2016
Agence Ter has won a bake-off to redesign Pershing Square in downtown Los Angeles for the fifth or sixth time. Or is it the seventh?

On a warm May weekday morning, Pershing Square in downtown Los Angeles was, as usual, a bit of a hybrid wasteland. Office workers crossed through as homeless people sprawled across concrete benches. Half the park was closed off for a row of plywood vendor booths related to an upcoming event. A father and son played alone in one of the park’s newly built playgrounds. People walking dogs veered toward the small patches of dirt that break up the park’s vast expanse of sun-baked concrete.

In The Weeds

September 1, 2015
Little-loved plants win the affection of Future Green Studio.

The huge backyard along the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn was the perfect site for the summertime Sunday afternoon parties that the DJs Justin Carter and Eamon Harkin liked to throw. It had plenty of space, room for a bar, and the overgrowth that comes alongside New York’s lovable Superfund waterway. But they had only temporary leases and permits to throw parties. Their time in the huge backyard wouldn’t last forever.

Sejong City

August 1, 2014
By merging landscape and architecture, Balmori Associates and H Architecture aim to create a new seat of government for South Korea—and a new form of urbanism.

For more than 600 years, Seoul has been the capital and center of South Korea. Roughly half of the country’s population lives in and around the city, and almost all government ministries have long been centered there. This concentration begat congestion, and after he was sworn in as president in 2003, the now-deceased Roh Moo-Hyun devised a plan to relocate many of the government’s hundreds of offices.

Staten Island Stink-Bomb Landfill Gets Makeover

November 1, 2010
The Fresh Kills Landfill on Staten Island was, for decades, the largest landfill in the world, taking in up to 29,000 tons a day of New York City trash for sequestration in what used to be a nice stretch of tidal wetland.

But after the last shipment of junk was unloaded back in 2001, the city saw an opportunity to give this 2,200-acre landfill—where the trash was piled nearly as high as the Statue of Liberty in some places—a more beautiful future.

Top-Down Greening In The Urban Core

July 27, 2006
Can cities get back in touch with nature? Planners, developers, architects, and policy makers convened in Los Angeles June 7 to face the challenge and develop a plan of action to help bring life onto the rooftops of L.A.'s downtown.

"Nature" is increasingly represented in the urban world as an incidental garnish -- a potted shrub at the door of a towering high-rise; a bush inside the loop of a freeway onramp.

These greening gestures calmly try to suggest a connection between the urban environment and the natural one. Yet other than providing window dressing, they contribute little to counter the harm that cities inflict on the natural ecology.

So what is a densely developed and thoroughly paved American downtown to do? ...