Housing


How Community-Led Renovation is Helping a Rundown Pittsburgh Neighborhood Fight Crime

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July 8, 2015
Slumlords are vanishing, crime is down and affordable housing on the rise: what can East Liberty teach us about the transformative power of regeneration?

Dorothea Burke is standing in the street, staring at her house. It’s a warm day in late May and after a hard Pittsburgh winter, Burke and many of her neighbours are in home improvement mode. Drills and power saws blare in the background. New windows are going in across the street and the house next to it is on the market. Facing her house, Burke, a 23-year resident of this block, is thinking about repointing her brickwork and maybe a paint job. “People are finally taking pride in their homes,” she says.

Beijing's Bomb Shelter-Dwellers May Be Making a Rational Choice About Their Commute

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April 16, 2013
An estimated 2 million Beijingers live in underground bomb shelters. But for many it's better than the 'burbs.

The numbers are undeniably mind-boggling: An estimated two million people in Beijing are said to be living below the earth's surface, in thousands of 100-square-foot spaces located just one or two stories below street level. These figures have been making headlines (and trending upwards) for a couple of years now. Assuming they're accurate, that would mean 10 percent of the city's 20 million people sleep in windowless, subterranean residences.

To Cite or To Site: Competing Ideologies for Addressing Homelessness

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August 17, 2009
To fight homelessness, some cities provide services, some build housing, and some arrest people. Often it's a combination of the three, but now many critics are calling on officials to de-emphasize the law enforcement element. Los Angeles is Ground Zero.

On any given night in America, there are about 664,000 people sleeping on the street. On that same night in Los Angeles, there are more than 40,000 -- the highest concentration of homeless people in any American city. Many of these homeless people can be found in downtown L.A.'s infamous 'Skid Row' neighborhood. This 50-square block area has been called ground zero for homelessness in the U.S. and one of the most-policed areas in the world, but the thousands bundled in sleeping bags and tents on its sidewalks every night call it home.

People Can't Live In A Mini-Mart

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April 13, 2007
This message is brought to you by the frustrated residents of a city where strip malls prosper and the stock of affordable housing struggles to keep up with demand.

A new strip mall being constructed at the intersection of Venice Blvd. and Western Ave. in Los Angeles inspired this public display.

Strip malls are in no short supply in L.A., and this is just one example of yet another being built in the city. Unmixed-use retail developments like this are popping up all over the place. Much less new housing is being built. And a sharply lower amount of new affordable housing is being built...

News Summary and Analysis - November 2006

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December 11, 2006
As part of a monthly series, we present a summary and analysis of some of the most interesting news to appear on Planetizen over the month of November 2006. This is the transcript of an audio segment that originally aired on the nationally syndicated radio program "Smart City".

In an effort to reduce traffic, cities across the globe are considering charging drivers to enter their most congested areas. Cities like London have implemented Congestion Pricing, which imposes a daily fee on drivers who enter certain high-traffic parts of the city. The New York Times reports that environmental and community groups in New York are pushing to impose congestion pricing in lower Manhattan during the busiest times of the day...

News Summary and Analysis - September 2006

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Date: 
October 18, 2006
As part of monthly series, we present a summary and analysis of some of the most interesting news to appear on Planetizen over the month of September 2006. This is the transcript of an audio segment that originally aired on the nationally syndicated radio program "Smart City".

Read the full transcript.

Listen to the audio podcast version of this summary and analysis.