Boston


Goodbye Highways

Date: 
February 7, 2017
The carving up of cities by expressways is still a civil rights problem, but it's being solved as an economic one.

Since freeways began slicing through cities in the United States more than 75 years ago, they have carved deep and lasting lines of separation through countless communities. Many of these communities—located in so-called blighted areas—were made up of people of color who were simply pushed aside by the transportation officials building out the nation’s vast network of interstates and urban freeways. In a somewhat surprising speech in March 2016, U.S.

The Map Geeks Behind 'Bostonography'

Publication:
Date: 
November 11, 2011
Cartographers are re-mapping the city of Boston in creative ways.

In this age of Google Maps and GPS in cell phones, hasn’t everything already been mapped?

“It’s probably the most common question a cartographer gets,” says Tim Wallace, who’s finishing his Ph.D. at the University of Wisconsin, Madison’s cartography program. “Yeah, spatially, most of the world, above water anyway, has been surveyed. But certainly not every phenomenon has been mapped.”

For cartographers, Wallace says, this concept is an edifying thought, and one that can provide countless opportunities to interpret places.