Benefits and Burdens in Post-World Cup South Africa


Publication:
Date: 
August 2, 2010
The 2010 World Cup has ended in South Africa. What's left behind are a number of physical and cultural legacies that will be both landmark developments and potential economic hazards.

There are no vuvuzelas. The plastic horns had been blaring at random throughout the city of Johannesburg for the entire month of the 2010 World Cup, which has just finished here in South Africa. They were even blaring the month before the Cup started -- in the middle of the morning, out of car windows on the freeway, inside the city's endless shopping malls. But now that it's over, the loud honk that had become a part of the city's background static has faded out.

Gone too are the hordes of soccer fans from all over the world, as well as the global media that was almost impossible to miss in the event's host cities. Johannesburg, being the country's main airport hub, was especially crowded with foreigners, giving the city a strange dichotomy of locals and outsiders -- a line sometimes hard to decipher in this melting pot city, even for the country's born-and-bred.